A Tiny Post about Tiny Moments

You are in a cave. The obvious path is to the right but it’s unclear from where you start whether there could be other offshoots at the top or bottom.

Take a step. Sit down.

The primary challenge of any game is simply to put in the time. Maybe there are other difficulties, but the simple concept of spending time is fundamental and always required. Patience can be hard, whether for a long grind or a series of repeated attempts. And there are so many other things that could absorb us and take us away from a particular experience.

Vesper.5 involves walking and looking, but it’s a challenging game because it requires a different kind of time and patience. Not the long grind, but the commitment to a regular habit. It restricts you to one step per day, and that requires you to be willing to incorporate it into your lifestyle in an ongoing way. It’s a small amount of time but still might be a lot to ask. It doesn’t need to be daily. Skipping a day will slow your progress but no one’s timing you. It just needs to be regular enough not to forget about it.

This kind of difficulty isn’t the most common, but it’s in some ways similar to games where you need to log in regularly to water plants or feed pets. Those become part of day-to-day life too, but they always felt like routine, whereas Vesper.5 really is a ritual. For a while it was a quick moment to breathe and reflect. Take a step. Sit down.

Once it was over I felt Vesper.5’s absence. Some people would begin again immediately to keep the experience going but I didn’t feel like I could. It doesn’t feel the same to move through a space I’ve already explored.

In the time since then snippets of this post have lain unfinished. I was having a difficult time and I didn’t have the energy or the words to express what I wanted to. Only now can I stumble upon my notes and remember to be grateful to Vesper.5 for being a small thing that was there when I wanted it. That probably sounds overblown for a short game about walking a step at a time, but tiny moments matter.