… Woah. Psalms 137 A Lament of Israelites in Exile 1 By the rivers of Babylon we sat down; there we wept when we remembered Zion. We put away our harps, hanging them on the branches of poplar trees. for the Beatitudes of the Psalms. If someone hits you, you must not hit them back! King James Version (KJV) Public Domain. Bible Commentary Early Church Fathers Medieval Patristic. The singer swears an oath by what is most dear to a musician—hands and tongue—to exalt Jerusalem always (Ps 137:5–6). What does one say about this Psalm? See notes above, which show that the "post-exilic" assumption involves insuperable difficulties if this Psalm is sundered from the contemporary prophecies of Isaiah (especially Psalms 13:1-14; Psalms 13:27), and from a Babylon under Assyrian rule. Question: Psalm:137:9 is a verse which has bothered me for years: “Happy shall he be that taketh and dasheth thy little ones against the stones.” How can Christians oppose abortion, yet believe in a God who encouraged Israel to slaughter infants and to rejoice in doing it?! Psalms 137:9 • 1 Votes Q (Psalms … 4But how could we sing a song of the LORD. This is a complicated and difficult question. Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools. 137:0 This is Psalm 137 in the whole book, the 37 th of the third fifty. See App-63. New American BibleBlessed the one who seizes your children and smashes them against the rock. Re: Psalm 137:9 - What the Hell!? Isaiah 13:16 Their inhabitants shall be dashed in pieces before their eyes: their houses shall be pillaged, and their wives shall be ravished. By the rivers of Babylon we sat and wept when we remembered Zion. The meaning is pretty obvious in context. The Roman Catholic Church states that the Greek word BAPTIZO is used in Luke 11:38 to refer to the Pharisees “washing,” and use this passage to … Ignatius Bible (RSV2CE), 2nd Edition (Paperback) Her he calls unhappy, but him happy who pays her as she has served us. AlNg. "I am an Anglo-Catholic in religion, a classicist in literature, and a royalist in politics". Psalm 137 is the 137th psalm of the Book of Psalms, and as such it is included in the Hebrew Bible. [A&W, p. 33] Unfortunately the OT contains other less than edifying practices, for example: the deceit of Jacob in Genesis 27, incest in Genesis 19:32 and inhumanity in Psalm 137:9. Hnau von Thulcandra Posts: 566 Age: 27 Country: United States. Copyright 2019-2020 USCCB, please review our Privacy Policy, On Fraternity and Social Friendship (Fratelli Tutti). we hung up our harps. There on the poplars we hung our harps, for there our captors asked us for songs, our tormentors demanded songs of joy; they said, “Sing us one of the songs of Zion!” How can we sing the songs of the LORD while in a foreign land? rewardeth. Psalm 137:9 shocks: “Blessed shall he be who takes your little ones and dashes them against the rock!”. If we read the Scripture in context and then go to other Scriptures and history we find its true meaning. (Psalms 137:1) By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion. Psalms 137:9. 2 We hung our harps Upon the willows in the midst of it. Psalms 137:1 By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion. 1 By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion. They only used the first half of the Psalm and skipped the last verse: Psalms 137:9 Happy shall he be, that taketh and dasheth thy little ones against the stones. How are we supposed to answer the opponent of Christianity who throws Psalm 137:9 in our faces?" Chapter Parallel Compare. Like all other FALSE Christians, these Negro song writers pick and chose from the Bible. Psalm 137 - Beside the rivers of Babylon, we sat and wept as we thought of Jerusalem. Beside the rivers of Babylon, we sat and weptas we thought of Jerusalem.#:1 Hebrew Zion; also in 137:3.We put away our harps,hanging them on the branches of poplar trees.For our captors demanded a … In its whole form of nine verses, the psalm reflects the yearning for Jerusalem as well as hatred for the Holy City's enemies with sometimes violent imagery. There on the poplars we hung our harps, for there our captors asked us for songs, our tormentors demanded songs of joy; they said, “Sing us one of the songs of Zion!” How can we sing the songs of the LORD while in a foreign land? See App-63. 9 Happy is the one who seizes your infants and dashes them against the rocks. The Psalm ends with a prayer that the old enemies of Jerusalem, Edom and Babylon, be destroyed (Ps 137:7–9). Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools. Psalms 137. Throwing infants against rocks ? * [Psalm 137] A singer refuses to sing the people’s sacred songs in an alien land despite demands from Babylonian captors (Ps 137:1–4). To KILL them in a flood or in the "passover" is simply murder - pure and simple. This makes following Jesus different from following other people. ... Commentary on Psalm 137(138) - Catholic Online. Psalm 137:9 controversy. B.C. Like all other FALSE Christians, these Negro song writers pick and chose from the Bible. 137. 3 For there our gaolers had asked us to sing them a song, our captors to make merry, 'Sing us one of the songs of Zion.' ... Includes the Catholic Encyclopedia, Church Fathers, Summa, Bible and more — all for only $19.99... Psalm 1 Psalm 2 Psalm 3 Psalm 4 Psalm 5 Psalm 6 Psalm 7 Psalm 8 Psalm 9 Psalm 10 Psalm 11 Psalm 12 Psalm 13 Psalm 14 Psalm 15 Psalm 137:9. Roman Catholic Baptism. * [ 137:9 ] Blessed the one who seizes your children and smashes them against the rock : the children represent the future generations, and so must be destroyed if the enemy is truly to be eradicated. Contemporary English VersionMay the Lord bless everyone who beats your children against the rocks! In Psalm 137:9, it is injustice to kill the Baby and innocent Donkey - Muslim vs Christian (Psalms 137:2) We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof. Psalms 137:7 The prophet curses Edom and Babel. You must let them hit you again! 60 day Money Back Guarantee; No Questions asked; You have plenty of time to decide if your Audio Bible product is right for you. Psalm 137:9 in all English translations. Whenever I debate someone about Bible literal-ism they usually mention Psalm 137:9 KJV. In the post-Vatican II three-year cycle of the Catholic mass liturgy, the psalm is part of the service on Laetare Sunday, that is the fourth Sunday in Lent, of the "B" cycle. The Religion team sees Psalm 137: 7-9 appear in virtually any conversation on an article that mentions the Bible or one of our many pieces of scriptural commentary. Happy [shall he be] that taketh and dasheth thy little ones against the stones.] They only used the first half of the Psalm and skipped the last verse: Psalms 137:9 Happy shall he be, that taketh and dasheth thy little ones against the stones. A.M. cir. Sacred Scripture. The rivers of Babylon are the Euphrates river, its tributaries, and the Tigris river (possibly the river Habor, the Chaboras, or modern Khabur, which joins the Euphrates at Circesium). Psalms 137:1 By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion. 2 On the willows near by. ... Psalm 137:9 . It reflects the sorrows and thoughts of one of the captives, either during the captivity itself, or shortly afterward when the memories of … (If you like words, you may like to know this: The word "rock" in Psalm 137:9 is the same word as the capital city of Edom!) Psalm 137:1. If I forget you, Jerusalem, may my right hand forget its skill. A psalm of David, for Jeremias. I am having trouble understanding Psalm 137 : 9 “Happy is the one who will seize and dash your infants against the rock!” What exactly is this referring to? (Psalm 49:5–9) What does this passage mean: "But he who is forgiven little, loves little." The children of Israel were taken by force from their homeland, a place given them by God. 3463. 137:9 Blessed be he that shall take and dash thy little ones against the rock. 00 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z PSALM 137. The Psalm ends with a prayer that the old enemies of Jerusalem, Edom and Babylon, be destroyed (Ps 137:7–9). Catholic Doors Ministry presents AN OUTLINE OF THE BOOK OF PSALMS. How are we supposed to answer the opponent of Christianity who throws Psalm 137:9 in our faces?" as we thought of Jerusalem. Sacred Scripture. A Lament of Israelites in Exile. Psalms 137. Psalm 137:9 Too often I've seen this be quoted by some to mean: "Your God is terrible because he approves of smashing children on rocks" "Your God/the Bible says killing children brings happiness" But as always, it's important to actually read the psalm. I’ve had non-Christians throw this verse at me and I can’t give them a good answer. Herewith the Psalm closes, “Happy, that takes and dashes your little ones against the rock” (Ps. Happy shall he be, that taketh and dasheth thy little ones against the stones. * [137:9] Blessed the one who seizes your children and smashes them against the rock: the children represent the future generations, and so must be destroyed if the enemy is truly to be eradicated. Hosea 13:16 Let Samaria perish, because she hath stirred up her God to bitterness: let them perish by the sword, let their little ones be dashed, and let the women with child be ripped up. * [ 137:9 ] Blessed the one who seizes your children and smashes them against the rock : the children represent the future generations, and so must be destroyed if the enemy is truly to be eradicated. Bible Commentary Early Church Fathers Medieval Patristic. Psalm 137:8-9. Alongside Babylon’s rivers we sat on the banks; we cried and cried, remembering the good old days in Zion. 3 For our captors demanded a song from us. Catholic Bible So if you're debating a Catholic, holding that Catholic to fundamentalist Protestant assumptions like the earth is 6000 years old, or all of the Bible is literal makes no sense. Psalm 137:9King James Version (KJV) 9 Happy shall he be, that taketh and dasheth thy little ones against the stones. "Happy shall he be that taketh and dasheth thy little ones against the rock" (Psalms 137:9). For our captors demanded a song from us. 1 … [1] (Psalms 137:2) We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof. Retail: $39.99. 137:8 O daughter of Babylon, miserable: blessed shall he be who shall repay thee thy payment which thou hast paid us. cir. Is it justified in the Bible? The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops’ (USCCB’s) mission is to encounter the mercy of Christ and to accompany His people with joy. A psalm of David, for Jeremias. Psalm 137 is the 137th psalm of the Book of Psalms, and as such it is included in the Hebrew Bible. In his devotional, Roberts lists five ways for the verse to be looked, covering the realities of the Babylonian exile and what may have been experienced at their hands, the human sense for revenge-as-justice and the applicable lessons of grace, and Christ working through us. The voice of the Holy Spirit responds in Psalm 137:5, Psalm 137:6, If I forget thee, etc. 137. Psalm 137 begins with heart-breaking pathos and ends with shocking hostility. rewardeth. Psalm 137:9. Scripture: Psalms 126, Psalms 126:1-6, Psalms 137:9, Haggai 2:3, Nehemiah 1:2-3 (view more) (view less) Denomination: Independent/Bible. 137:0 This is Psalm 137 in the whole book, the 37 th of the third fifty. Psalm 137 begins with heart-breaking pathos and ends with shocking hostility. Psalm 137:8-9; Psalm 137:9; Share Tweet Save. The children of Israel were taken by force from their homeland, a place given them by God. 2 On the poplars there we had hung up our harps. * [ 137:9 ] Blessed the one who seizes your children and smashes them against the rock : the children represent the future generations, and so must be destroyed if the enemy is truly to be eradicated. (Psalms 137:1) By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion. This is the repayment. 3 Those who captured us told us to sing; they told us to entertain them: “Sing us a song about Zion.” 4 How can we sing a song to the LORD. Is there any interpretation about this? He said that his people must not do this. 5 May I never be able to play the harp again. The meaning is pretty obvious in context. It's not a direct command by God, or anything like that. Verses 7-9 make it explicit: > 7 Remember, LORD, what the Edomites did on the day Jerusalem fell. Our tormentors insisted on a joyful hymn: “Sing us one of those songs of Jerusalem!” 4 But how can we sing the songs of the Lord. (Psalm 137:4) Why does the Catholic Catechism omit commandment #2 (You shall not make idols) and split #10 (You shall not covet your neighbor's belongings) into two, making them #9 and #10? For example the Muslims especially make use of Psalm 137:9 Happy the one who takes and dashes your little ones against the rock! In fact - in ancient times - where the life expectancy was below 30 - these children (The catholic church says that age 7 is the age of reason) - represent about 20 percent of the population. An imprecation of this type invoked against innocent and helpless little children is contrary to the word of Christ and the holy apostles; yet this is an accurate statement of the attitude that was common among the warring peoples of antiquity. Apologetics. "The psalm is a hymn expressing the yearnings of the Jewish people in exile following the Babylonian conquest of Jerusalem in 586 BC" It's a SONG. Alongside the quaking aspens we stacked our unplayed harps; That’s where our captors demanded songs, sarcastic and mocking: “Sing us a happy Zion song!” Oh, how could we ever sing GOD’s song in this wasteland? For example the Muslims especially make use of Psalm 137:9 Happy the one who takes and dashes your little ones against the rock! TO SOME PEOPLE WORSHIP MAY BE A PHYSICAL ACT OR WORDS OF ADMIRATION. "n its whole form, the psalm reflects the yearning for Jerusalem as well as hatred for the Holy City's enemies with sometimes violent imagery." He said that his people must not do this. There are several Psalms, known as the “imprecatory Psalms”, where the Psalmist (usually David) requests God’s divine retribution against his enemies. )The author of this beautiful and affecting elegy is unknown, but the occasion is evident; and it was most probably composed during, or … Question: Psalm:137:9 is a verse which has bothered me for years: “Happy shall he be that taketh and dasheth thy little ones against the stones.” How can Christians oppose abortion, yet believe in a God who encouraged Israel to slaughter infants and to rejoice in doing it?! 8 Daughter Babylon, doomed to destruction, happy is the one who repays you according to what you have done to us. OT Poetry: Psalm 137:9 Happy shall he be who takes (Psalm Ps Psa.) Psalm 137 begins with heart-breaking pathos and ends with shocking hostility. August 29, 2017 at 12:51 am (August 28, 2017 at 8:51 pm Why does the psalmist in psalms 137:9 state, "Blessed is he who takes your little ones and dashes them against the rock"? Verses 7-9 make it explicit: > 7 Remember, LORD, what the Edomites did on the day Jerusalem fell. December 11, 2020, 5:49am #1. 1 By the rivers of Babylon we sat down; there we wept when we remembered Zion. 8Daughter Babylon, doomed to destruction, happy is the one who repays you according to what you have done to us.9Happy is the one who seizes your infants and dashes them against the rocks. You must let them hit you again! To KILL them in a flood or in the "passover" is simply murder - pure and simple. Blessed be he that shall take and dash thy little ones against the rock. What is the deal with murdering babies? (If you like words, you may like to know this: The word "rock" in Psalm 137:9 is the same word as the capital city of Edom!) In English it is generally known as "By the rivers of Babylon", which is how its first words are translated in the King James Version.It is Psalm 136 in the slightly different numbering system of the Greek Septuagint and the Latin Vulgate versions of the Bible. 8Desolate Daughter Babylon, you shall be destroyed, 9*Blessed the one who seizes your children. Apologetics. Psalm 137 is a hymn expressing the yearnings of the Jewish people during their Babylonian exile. I’ve had non-Christians throw this verse at me and I can’t give them a good answer. theCardinalbird. WHAT DO YOU THINK OF WHEN YOU HEAR THE WORD WORSHIP? Michael, the prince of Jerusalem, answers in Psalm 137:7, Remember, O Lord, etc. If I forget you, Jerusalem, may my right hand forget its skill. Now read the words that Jesus said at the top of the psalm. Douay-Rheims BibleBlessed be he that shall take and dash thy little ones against the rock. Singing A Song In A Strange Land Contributed by Steven Strickland on Apr 13, 2020 | 1,563 views. The psalm is a hymn expressing the yearnings of the Jewish people in exile following the Babylonian conquest of Jerusalem in 607 BCE. Expositions on the Psalms. In captivity they sat by the edge of the Euphrates and wept, overcome with despair. Top. By the rivers of Babylon we sat and wept when we remembered Zion. 2 We put away our harps, hanging them on the branches of poplar trees. Psalms 137:1 The constancy of the Jews in captivity. The Roman Catholic baptism is done by sprinkling and not by immersion as you have already stated. d. [137:7] Jer 49:7; Lam 4:21–22; Ez 25:12–14. Gabriel, the prince of Zion, then addresses the destroyer of the Babylonish nation, in Psalm 137:8, Psalm 137:9, Happy shall be he that rewardeth thee, etc. If we read the Scripture in context and then go to other Scriptures and history we find its true meaning. #64 by Sityl » Jul 21, 2010 9:15 pm . We wept when we remembered Zion." The Psalm ends with a prayer that the old enemies of Jerusalem, Edom and Babylon, be destroyed (Ps 137:7–9). Psalm 137 begins with heart-breaking pathos and ends with shocking hostility. There are many scriptures that can be ripped out of their context to make a case against them. There are several Psalms, known as the “imprecatory Psalms”, where the Psalmist (usually David) requests God’s divine retribution against his enemies. In captivity they sat by the edge of the Euphrates and wept, overcome with despair. 137 By the rivers of Babylon, There we sat down, yea, we wept When we remembered Zion. Print view this post . This is a complicated and difficult question. 3 For there those who carried us away captive asked of us a song, And those who plundered us requested mirth, Saying, “Sing us one of the songs of Zion!” The psalmist writes from exile in what today is southern Iraq. Do we ask, what reward? Bible Gateway Recommends. Psalm 137:9. The voice of the Holy Spirit responds in Psalm 137:5, Psalm 137:6, If I forget thee, etc. 136:9). Psalm 137:9 King James Version (KJV) 9 Happy shall he be, that taketh and dasheth thy little ones against the stones. Psalm 149:6-9 Let the high praises of God be in their mouth, and a twoedged sword in their hand; … Isaiah 13:3-5 I have commanded my sanctified ones, I have also called my mighty ones for mine anger, even them that rejoice in my highness… Isaiah 44:28 The Psalm ends with a prayer that the old enemies of Jerusalem, Edom and Babylon, be destroyed (Ps 137:7–9). Happy [shall he be] that taketh and dasheth thy little ones against the stones.] 1 By the rivers of Babylon we sat and wept at the memory of Zion. Featuring the Church Fathers, Catholic Encyclopedia, Summa Theologica and more. for the Beatitudes of the Psalms. Ps 137 is a lament for Jerusalem after the Babylonians have invaded and destroyed it. (Luke 7:47 ESV)? Psalms 137:9. KJV, Deluxe Reference Bible, Super Giant Print, Red Letter Edition, Comfort Print: Holy Bible, King James Version. (Psalms … Why did the Israelites refuse to sing about Zion? # 137:1 Hebrew Zion; also in 137:3. Psalm 137:9 German Bible Alphabetical: against and be blessed dashes he How infants little one ones rock rocks seizes the them who will your OT Poetry: Psalm 137:9 Happy shall he be who takes (Psalm Ps Psa.) 541. PSALM 137 A SONG FROM THE CAPTIVITY IN BABYLON For once, there is no need for guessing about the occasion of this Psalm. Commentary on Psalm 137(138) ... he does … Our tormentors insisted on a joyful hymn: “Sing us one of those songs of Jerusalem!” But how can we sing the songs of the LORD while in a pagan land? Ps 137 is a lament for Jerusalem after the Babylonians have invaded and destroyed it. So let's actually examine it: "By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat. Hosea 10:14 A tumult shall arise among thy people: and all thy fortresses shall be destroyed as Salmana was destroyed, by the house of him that judged Baal in the day of battle, the mother being dashed in pieces upon her children. The psalmist penned this poem while … ©2020 United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, Blessed the one who seizes your children and smashes them against the rock, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, Explore more inspirational selections here. See notes above, which show that the "post-exilic" assumption involves insuperable difficulties if this Psalm is sundered from the contemporary prophecies of Isaiah (especially Psalms 13:1-14; Psalms 13:27), and from a Babylon under Assyrian rule. Michael, the prince of Jerusalem, answers in Psalm 137:7, Remember, O Lord, etc. Psalm 137:9 NIV Psalm 137:9 NLT Psalm 137:9 ESV Psalm 137:9 NASB Psalm 137:9 KJV Psalm 137:9 Biblia Paralela Psalm 137:9 Chinese Bible Psalm 137:9 French Bible. (Title. If you are not satisfied for any reason, just call us. 1 Beside the rivers of Babylon, we sat and wept. 1:1-1:6 The Two Ways 2:1-2:11 God's Promise to His Anointed 3:1-3:8 Trust in God under Adversity 4:1-4:8 Confident Plea for Deliverance from Enemies 5:1-5:12 Trust in God for Deliverance from Enemies 6:1-6:10 Prayer for Recovery from Grave Illness in a foreign land? Gabriel, the prince of Zion, then addresses the destroyer of the Babylonish nation, in Psalm 137:8, Psalm 137:9, Happy shall be he that rewardeth thee, etc. With so much interest, we couldn’t ignore the topic of violence in the Bible any longer. May 7, 2018, 7:28pm #1. Now read the words that Jesus said at the top of the psalm. In fact - in ancient times - where the life expectancy was below 30 - these children (The catholic church says that age 7 is the age of reason) - represent about 20 percent of the population. Psalm 137:8-9: “O daughter of Babylon, who are to be destroyed, happy the one who repays you as you have served us! If someone hits you, you must not hit them back! Chapter Parallel Compare.